Please note that this assignment is going to turn into a podcast. Please write it as if I am speaking with the audience. Attached are instructions, t

05 Jun Please note that this assignment is going to turn into a podcast. Please write it as if I am speaking with the audience. Attached are instructions, t

Posted at 18:49hin Social Science / Philosophy by

Please note that this assignment is going to turn into a podcast. Please write it as if I am speaking with the audience. Attached are instructions, template/layout of the script, and 2 examples 

Week 9 Assignment 4

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Skill(s) Being Assessed: Problem Solving
Criteria for Success: In this assignment, you will:
· Provide a clear, concise overview of the 10 Skills and their importance for personal and professional life.
· Provide an overview of your philosophy of change that includes a summary of your approaches to reacting, framing, and managing change and use specific examples to connect them to approaches to solving problems.
· Explain the relationship between the 10 Skills and your personal philosophy of change using concrete examples to support ideas.
· Communicate personal experiences and beliefs that are clear, concise, and target a general audience.
· Develop a presentation or podcast that identifies a clear goal, is logically organized, adheres to time limits and includes written outline or script.
· Create an engaging presentation or podcast that is professional in overall quality and formatting.
What to submit/deliverables: Based on the option you choose to complete the assignment, you may submit either a presentation (recorded or live) or an audio podcast recording, including a written outline or script developed in the webtext.
What is the value of doing this assignment? At this point in your time at Strayer, you’ve had significant experience learning about, developing, and exercising the 10 Skills. How you’ve changed as a result of your experience with the 10 Skills is unique to your academic and personal journey and has likely impacted how you understand yourself and the world around you.
In your previous assignment, you used your problem solving skill to create your personal philosophy of change, which was informed by your personal and professional experiences. The purpose of this assignment is to effectively present how the 10 Skills inform and support your philosophy of change and/or the role your philosophy of change plays in your continued development of the 10 Skills. It also allows you to consider how your experience with the 10 Skills translates to employability and the hiring process.
The value of this assignment is to effectively communicate your experience with the 10 Skills to help others think differently about their own experiences and attitudes toward change. You will have the opportunity to practice sharing your problem solving process in creating your philosophy of change and in connecting your experiences with the 10 Skills to this personal philosophy. You will also practice agility and innovation in exploring new ways of thinking about change.
Your goal for this assignment is to: Use your problem solving, agility, and innovation skills to communicate how your experience with the 10 Skills relates to your philosophical understanding of change.
What you need to complete this assignment:
· Video camera, webcam, or audio capabilities for recording.
· Your personal philosophy of change (Week 7 Assignment).
· Audacity Installation and Use Instructions [PDF]  (optional for podcast).
· PowerPoint (optional).
Steps to complete:
Scenario: A local business leader is looking for ways to promote change around personal and professional growth and learning for all members of the community. They have asked you to present your philosophy of change to the community—through a recorded presentation (or live, if in the classroom) or through a podcast they will air this month—to help demonstrate the value of employable skills and opportunities for positive change. The goal is to use examples from your personal experience to help listeners understand how they could begin to think about their own philosophy of change and how they navigate change in different contexts.
STEP 1: Introduce yourself to the audience and identify the goal of your presentation or podcast in a clear, concise manner. Your goal should be centered around how some or all of the 10 Skills and a philosophy of change have helped you—and can help others—exercise their problem solving skill (approximately 1 minute or less).
STEP 2: Since your audience will be unfamiliar with the 10 Skills and your philosophy of change, you should provide an overview (approximately 1–3 minutes total) that addresses the following:
· What are the 10 Skills and why are they important in your personal and professional life? (Note: You do not need to list and define each skill, but you can speak of them broadly.)
· What is a philosophy of change and why is it important? How can it help you think about and solve problems in your life?
STEP 3: Discuss your experience with the 10 Skills and your personal philosophy of change (approximately 3–5 minutes). Note: You may choose to talk about all 10 Skills or to focus on only a few.
You can discuss any or all of the options below:
· How some or all of the 10 Skills have informed your philosophy of change.
· How some or all of the 10 Skills can support you living out your personal philosophy of change.
· How your personal philosophy of change can support your continued development of some or all of the 10 Skills.
Remember, your audience will likely be unfamiliar with the 10 Skills and your philosophy of change. Your grade is based on how well you communicate the connection between this information in a way your audience will understand.
Your visual or audio presentation should be approximately 6–8 minutes long. Format for the presentation will vary (depending on selection), but overall the focus should be on speed of overall presentation, tempo of sections, volume (loud versus soft; distractions in certain parts), use of filler words or phrases, inclusion of an introduction and a conclusion, and sounds practiced versus read. Refer to Chapters 8 and 9 in your webtext to review professional presentation skills and tips on how to successfully communicate to a diverse audience. If you choose to do a podcast, refer to the examples in your webtext (Page 9.7) as a reference for formatting and style.
· Podcast Example 1 [M4A] : 
. Example 1 Transcript [DOCX] .
. Example 1 – Why It’s an A [DOCX] .
· Podcast Example 2 [M4A] : 
. Example 2 Transcript [DOCX] .
. Example 2 – Why It’s a C [DOCX] .
STEP 4: Upload your recorded presentation or podcast (including written outline or script) to Blackboard in Week 9. Review the rubric on the assignment submission page.
See  Creating an Outline or Script for Week 9 Assignment [PDF] .
,

PHI201
© 2020 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.
Page 1 of 5
Creating an Outline or Script for Week 9 Assignment
Prepare for Recording
For many, hitting “record” is stressful. What are you going to say? How are you going to say it? What happens if you mess up?
While you cannot plan for everything, you can avoid some of the most common with strong preparation. As part of the Week 9 Assignment requirements, you are asked to prepare by developing either an outline or a script.
The focus should be deciding, in general, what you want to say and when to say it. This simple act of planning makes it easier to hit that record button and, when combined with some solid practice, increases your chances of making a solid presentation or podcast.
Two Options
Different people have different preferences in how they work. Do you want to create a general overview to work from (an outline), or do you want to write something to help you make sure you get the words just right (a script)? The overall structure of either will be the same. The only real difference for this assignment will be how much you write.
NOTE: Using a script can be difficult without practicing. It is important to avoid sounding like you are reading (or looking like it if presenting on camera or in person). Remember, the script is there to help make sure you collect your thoughts and deliver the presentation the way you want. It is not meant to be read word-for-word in front of the camera or audience.
Structure
OPENING INTRODUCTION OVERVIEW – FIRST POINT OVERVIEW – SECOND POINT RELATIONSHIP (FIRST POINT TO SECOND POINT) KEY EXAMPLE(S) CLOSING
Example for Assignment – Outline (Based on “Podcast Example A”)
1. Opening.
a. Name.
b. Background.

PHI201
© 2020 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.
Page 2 of 5
2. Introduction.
a. Philosophy of Change.
b. 10 Skills.
3. Overview – First Point.
a. Heraclitus quote.
b. Change.
i. Connect change to quote.
c. Electronics example.
i. Background.
ii. Learning.
iii. Transition to 10 Skills (agility).
4. Overview – Second Point.
a. Return to Heraclitus quote and connect to 10 Skills/theme.
b. 10 Skills and different experience levels.
5. Key Example – Agility/Innovation/Problem Solving.
a. Focus on these.
b. Margaret Atwood quote.
c. Connect philosophy of change and 10 Skills through quote.
6. Closing.
a. Review key points on change.
b. Leave audience with something to remember.
i. Two options: be ready or ignore.

PHI201
© 2020 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.
Page 3 of 5
ii. One is good.
Example for Assignment – Script (Based on “Podcast Example A”)
OPENING
My name is Ed Buchanan and I have traveled many different roads in nearly 40 years. From working in the professional world to working toward a degree, my experience points to one specific idea.
INTRODUCTION
Today I will share my philosophy of change and how it is reinforced through experience working with employable skills.
OVERVIEW – FIRST POINT
“The way up and the way down are one and the same. Living and dead, waking and sleeping, young and old, are the same.” —Heraclitus, Life Is Flux, about 500 BC
All of these comparisons have one thing in common: change. They are the same because they all involve a degree of change. If you do not look deeply, you may argue that there is no change happening in people who sleep or are dead, but that is not correct. Sleeping people breathe, cells heal, the brain functions and continues to work through the day’s problems. Even in death, we change. Some body functions may continue well after our deaths. We are not the same physical beings at the time of death as we are months or years afterward. Heraclitus believed that “the only constant is change” and that idea still drives people forward today.
If we settle on this idea that change is the only constant, we can use this as the motivation to move forward. I can remember working at a major company in my 20s. It was a good job where I worked on electronics equipment. Translation: I played with broken stereos, TVs, cameras, and camcorders, and did my best to make sure they were working when I shipped them back to the customers.
I was paid well—even though I had no real background in electronics repair—but I dedicated myself to learning. When a piece of equipment came in that I had never seen before, I sat down next to our senior technicians and watched as they took it apart, identified the problems, and corrected them. I was smart enough to recognize what I did not know and self-aware. The only way to improve was to find people who could show me the way and soak up everything I could.
I did well. In fact, I did this so well that within a few short years I worked my way to the highest technician level and was moved around the shop to work wherever there was a heavy

PHI201
© 2020 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.
Page 4 of 5
workload. My agility made me a key team member and helped me pay my increasing school bills. I wouldn’t be where I am today if I had not used my skills and interacted with the change all around me.
Going from unskilled to top tech level in a few short years is a good way to showcase how to address the changing world, but it’s not the only story. Dealing with change was at the heart of each moment in that journey. I had to change my knowledge level. I had to change my outlook and recognize where I needed to learn and who could teach me. I had to change the way my
manager viewed me (beginning as unknowledgeable and becoming the go-to guy). Change, change, change.
OVERVIEW – SECOND POINT
What we will do now is talk about how each of you interacts with change. I have shared my outlook, mostly leaning on what Heraclitus said a long, long time ago. What do you know about change? How do you deal with it? More importantly, how will you deal with change next time you encounter it? [4:02]
These are the basic questions I used to help think of the role change plays in my life. They conveniently will help you do the same. When I think through these questions, my mind goes right to recent experience with the 10 skills taught in Strayer gen ed courses—skills that employers are looking for because people that have these skills succeed. Communication. Problem solving. Agility. Self and social awareness. Technology. Initiative. Productivity. Results driven. Relationship building. Innovation.
Like many people, I had different experience levels with different skills. Some of these skills, I came in with a really strong idea of what it meant. Other skills, I didn’t have quite the same grasp. What I did learn is that each of these skills developed over time. Stepping back, I realize that these all revolve around the same thing: change.
KEY EXAMPLE
Agility is how well you can adapt to an ever-changing world. Innovation is looking at new ways to address barriers or ways of doing things. Problem solving is changing a situation to fix something that is going wrong.
We started with an ancient philosopher, journeyed to the recent past and experience with the 10 skills, and now we move to the final part of my philosophy of change.

PHI201
© 2020 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.
Page 5 of 5
For most of us, change is not a light switch. We don’t just flip it and something inside of ourselves magically changes the world around us. The last part of my philosophy of change comes courtesy of Margaret Atwood. Many people will know her for the Hulu series The Handmaid’s Tale and this quote comes from her book of the same name:
“Nothing changes instantaneously: in a gradually heating bathtub you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”
When the world around us gets more dangerous, we often do not recognize it. When the signs surround us that change is coming, we may not pay enough attention. What I encourage everyone to do, though, is to have a plan, or at least an idea, of how they want to respond to change and the person they need to be when change pops up in your life.
CLOSING
Change surrounds each of us—at home, at work, at school, sometimes just driving home after a long day. If we have a philosophy about how we deal with change, it can take a little of the sting out of change and make change something you actually look for in your life.
I cannot tell you what change is coming. What I can say is you have two options: be ready or ignore it. Only one of these options will pay off.

Creating an Outline or Script for Week 9 Assignment

Prepare for Recording
Two Options
Structure
Example for Assignment – Script (Based on “Podcast Example A”)

OPENING
INTRODUCTION
OVERVIEW – FIRST POINT
OVERVIEW – SECOND POINT
KEY EXAMPLE
CLOSING

,

PHI201

Podcast Example A Transcript
My name is Ed Buchanan and I have travelled many different roads in nearly 40 years. From working in the professional world to working toward a degree, my experience points to one specific idea. Today I will share my philosophy of change and how it is reinforced through experience working with employable skills.
“The way up and the way down are one and the same. Living and dead, waking and sleeping, young and old, are the same.” -Heraclitus, Life is Flux, circa 500 BC
All of these comparisons have one thing in common: change. They are the same because they all involve a degree of change. If you do not look deeply, you may argue that there is no change happening in people who sleep or are dead, but that is not correct. Sleeping people breathe, cells heal, the brain functions and continues to work through the day’s problems. In addition, even in death we change. Some body functions may continue well after our deaths. We are not the same physical beings at the time of death as we are months or years afterward. Heraclitus believed that “The only constant is change” and that idea still drives people forward today.
If we settle on this idea that change is the only constant, we can use this as the motivation to move forward. I can remember working at a major company in my twenties. It was a good job where I worked on electronics equipment. Translation: I played with broken stereos, TVs, cameras and camcorders and did my best to make sure they were working when I shipped them back to the customers. I was paid well even though I had no real background in electronics repair but I dedicated myself to learning. When a piece of equipment came in that I had never seen before, I sat down next to our senior technicians and watched as they took it apart, identified the problems, and corrected them. I was smart enough to recognize what I did not know and self-aware. The only way to improve was to find people who could show me the way and soak up everything I could.
I did well. In fact, I did this so well that within a few short years I worked my way to the highest technician level and was moved around the shop to work wherever there was a heavy workload. My agility made me a key team member and helped me pay my increasing school bills. I wouldn’t be where I am today if I had not used my skills and interacted with the change all around me.
Going from unskilled to top tech level in a few short years is a good way to showcase how to address the changing world, but it’s not the only story. Dealing with change was at the heart of each moment in that journey. I had to change my knowledge level. I had to change my outlook and recognize where I needed to learn and who could teach me. I had to change the way my manager viewed me (beginning as unknowledgeable and becoming the go-to guy). Change. Change. Change.
What we will do now is talk about how each of you interacts with change. I have shared my outlook, mostly leaning on what Heraclitus said a long, long time ago. What do you know about change? How do you deal with it? More importantly, how will you deal with change next time you encounter it?
These are the basic questions I used to help think of the role change plays in my life. They conveniently will help you do the same. When I think through these questions, my mind goes right to recent experience with the 10 Skills taught in Strayer Gen Ed courses. Skills that employers are looking for because people that have these skills succeed: communication, problem solving, agility, self and social awareness, technology, initiative, productivity, results driven, relationship building, innovation. Stepping back, I realize that these all revolve around the same thing: change.
Agility is how well you can adapt to an ever-changing world. Innovation is looking at new ways to address barriers or ways of doing things. Problem solving is changing a situation to fix something that is going wrong.
We started with an ancient philosopher, journeyed to the recent past and experience with the 10 Skills, and now we move to the final part of my philosophy of change.
For most of us, change is not a light switch. We do not just flip something inside of ourselves and magically the world has changed. The last part of my philosophy of change comes courtesy of Margaret Atwood. Many people will know her for the Netflix series The Handmaid’s Tale and this quote comes from her book of the same name:
“Nothing changes instantaneously: in a gradually heating bathtub you’d be boiled to death before you knew it.”
When the world around us gets more dangerous, we often do not recognize it. When the signs surround us that change is coming, we may not pay enough attention. What I encourage everyone to do, though, is to have a plan, or at least an idea, of how they want to respond to change and the person they need to be when change pops up in your life.
Change surrounds each of us. At home, at work, at school, sometimes just driving home after a long day. If we have a philosophy about how we deal with change, it can take a little of the sting out of change and make change something you actually look for in your life.
I cannot tell you what change is coming. What I can say is you have two options: be ready for it or ignore it. Only one of these options will pay off.
© 2020 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.
Page 1 of 1
,
My name is Jasmine Fitzgerald, and for many years I have lived my life through others, scared to take a risk. From finding out my sexuality, real friends, and moving out of state, I have taught myself that if I want to change, I am responsible for making it happen. Today I will share my philosophy of change and how the most superficial differences you make in life create a whole new outlook.
“Change equals self-improvement. Push yourself to places you haven’t seen before.” – Pat Summitt
Self-improvement is the quest to make ourselves better in any and every facet of life. I believe the most challenging thing for a person to do, is to realize their flaws. If someone were to come up and ask you, “What is one thing you would change about yourself?” what would you say? I would be nonverbal at that moment. That’s how I was for most of my life, letting people tell me who I was or what I need to do, from my hair down to who I should like. I was tired of it. Finally, a change took over me and created a better self through many situations.
I came out as when I was in my freshmen year of college. I always knew about myself but hid it because I didn’t want to add another reason for someone to control me. I was the type that I thought I had “friends” but only was invited because of my famous older siblings. I was never known as Jasmine but as “Michael or Chris’s sister.” At that moment, you want to escape. Move from all things that create a terrible memory or hold you back. I found a true friend through that process in which I was finally able to move from what was holding me captive. I always stayed in a place because of other people, and this was my decision. Finally, something I CHOSE.
That choice I made helped me to become a better individual. I moved somewhere that I was able to express myself with little judgment openly. I work for a company that encourages their employees to change others and give us the gratitude of being our voice. My initiative and results- driven helped me take charge of myself and the opportunities presented to me. The innovation introduced me to something new and helped me decide what I wanted and what change meant.
Going from nonverbal to having a voice and a choice is an excellent way to address change. That is never the end of anyone’s story. In those few years, a part of me had died, and a new I was created. I had to change not only the outlook of myself but through others. I wanted them to see me for who I was. Sometimes that means losing the ones you love and moving somewhere you are not known.
You are probably thinking, what is your point? How can this affect my decision to change my life? How will these fundamentals support me in the future? If we only settle with words instead of actions, wherein there is a change being created?
These are questions that you may be thinking about while I am speaking with you. I finally was able to take my steps towards change by following them. Many steps include a philosophy of change that helped me through my journey and can help you also. I am going to list 10 of them but will only talk about a few. Communication, problem-solving, agility, self and social awareness, initiative, productivity, results-driven, relationship building, and innovations are fundamental to a philosophy of change.
The initiative is taking advantage of opportunities that pass by. Result- driven is the ability to get things done. Innovation is the introduction of something new. In my personal life, I used these to finally explore a whole new me and let others know that nothing can be taken for granted. Not only were these essential in my personal experiences but also in my professional experiences.
We have spoken about past experiences and the meaning behind the quote of a famous and inspiring basketball coach. We are finally coming to the end of my philosophy of change.
It is not easy for everyone to change. We all have barriers that we can’t push through or are not willing to break down. Ernest Gaines, an American writer, once said, “There will always be men struggling to change, and there will always be those who are controlled by the past.”
This world changes every day, and it’s up to us if we want to hear it. We can either be part of the change or look the other way. We can choose to make changes in our life or stay in the past. Life is not going to change itself. It is up to us to make the changes and create our philosophy.
I cannot tell you what to do with your life. My advice is to find yourself first, don’t let others dictate who you are, and don’t be afraid to make the change. It is going to be hard at first, but later it will be all worth it.

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